Vision

Vision_Page_Banner.jpgImagine one continuous greenway from the Neponset River to Franklin Park and up Columbia Road to Castle Island. Or from the Mystic River through Sullivan Square and Charlestown to downtown Boston.

This is the future. A 200 mile network of tree-lined, shared-use paths linked together so you don’t have to stop and start. When completed, this system will connect every neighborhood to open space, transit and jobs and thereby increase mobility, promote active recreation, improve climate change resiliency and enhance our city’s competitiveness in the global economy.  


Boston's Greenway Legacy

Through the efforts of urban park pioneers Frederick Law Olmsted and Charles Eliot, Boston has a rich legacy of linear parks and greenways, but the full concept was never finished. 

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"The enjoyment of scenery employs the mind without fatigue, and yet exercises it; tranquilizes it and yet enlivens it." - Frederick Law Olmstead

 

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Boston's Greenways Today

Residents and visitors enjoy 100 miles of existing greenway paths in Metro Boston, but major gaps and missing links limit access and connectivity for many people.

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“By collaborating with the Emerald Network, park groups, community volunteers and other grassroots organizations can repair the broken connections and provide more access to the parks for everyone.” -  Karen Mauney-Brodek, President of the Emerald Necklace Conservancy

 

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Emerald Network's Vision

The Emerald Network builds on this portfolio of 100 miles of greenways to create a seamless 200-mile network across the urban core, from the Mystic River in the north to the Neponset River in the south.

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“The Emerald Network takes Boston’s local plan to scale in the region. It sets a vision for connecting our communities, improving mobility and increasing access to this region’s parks.” –Chris Osgood, Boston Chief of Streets 

 

 

 

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